RISE award & Laureates

About the RISE award

The RISE award is a prestigious award that is presented to staff members of the Faculty of Science in recognition of outstanding commitment to increasing gender equality at the Faculty of Science, Leiden University.

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"How important it is for us to recognize and celebrate our heroes and she-roes!"

Maya Angelou

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Laureates

The RISE award has been presented twice since the foundation of RISE. Below you can read more about the laureates.

Next awardee?

Do you know somebody who deserves the next RISE award? Please contact us!

 

Nomination letters can be send to rise@science.leidenuniv.nl

Self nominations are not accepted.

Prof. dr. Geert de Snoo

Prof. dr. Geert de Snoo received the RISE award during his farewell reception as dean of the Faculty of Science on August 29 2019.

Prof. De Snoo played a major role in the initiation of our RISE network as he linked Martina Vijver and Miranda van Eck when they received their NWO ASPASIA grants to stimulate diversity. He not only stimulated the cohesion between female scientists at the faculty, but also took their advice seriously.  A few times a year the dean met with the board of RISE to discuss gender policy at the Faculty. Important issues were discussed, ranging from the amount of nursing rooms in the buildings to stimulation of a safe working environment or gender payment gaps. During these conversations RISE got to know De Snoo as a real people’s person “mensen-mens in Dutch”, who can listen very well and truly wants to encourage the diversity amongst employees.

Prof. dr. Eric Eliel

Prof. dr. Eric Eliel received the 1st RISE award during his farewell reception as scientific director of the Physics Institute on April 18 2018.

Prof. Eliel has been a supporter of RISE since the very start of the network. His dedication to increasing gender equality is illustrated clearly by himself in an interview on his term as scientific director:

"I set it as a goal to make LION the most female-friendly physics institute in The Netherlands. Of course this is not measurable, but it gives you a spot on the horizon. And it’s not even about the events you organize, like a women’s lunch or a day for women in science, but what matters is the message you keep conveying as director. I’ve heard from many people that this gives them the feeling that gender issues are taken seriously by the management, and that they find this reassuring.”

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